Acute Trauma Factor Associations With Suicidality Across the First 5 Years After Traumatic Brain Injury

Chelsy Foulk, SN

Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury are 3 to 4 times more likely to die as a result of suicide compared to the general population.  Suicidal ideation and suicide attempt were measured in this study and together they make up suicidality. Suicidal ideation was measured via the Patient Health Questionnaire 9, and Suicidal attempt in the last year was assessed via interview. This longitudinal study was completed with 3575 participants with TBI from 15 TBIMS Centers. As the severity of the injury increased, the suicide ideation in participants increased. Adults with unintentional major traumatic injuries with a severity score >12 were found to have >4 time the risk of suicide attempt, even after psychiatric conditions, physical comorbidities, and other psychosocial factors were adjusted for. The neurobiological factors that contribute to suicidality after TBI should be noted and care for these individuals adjusted (Kesinger, et. al., 2016).

Kesinger, M. R., Juengst, S. B., Bertisch, H., Niemeier, J. P., Krellman, J. W., Pugh, M. J., . . . Wagner, A. K. (2016). Acute Trauma Factor Associations With Suicidality Across the First 5 Years After Traumatic Brain Injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,97(8), 1301-1308. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2016.02.017

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